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Finding the Greater Self

Meditations for Harmony and Healing

Hardback
March 2003
9781855841376
More details
  • Publisher
    Rudolf Steiner Press
  • Published
    7th March 2003
  • ISBN 9781855841376
  • Language English
  • Pages 80 pp.
$17.95

As a spiritual teacher Rudolf Steiner wrote many beautifully formed and inspired verses. Often they were given in relation to specific situations or in response to individual requests; sometimes they were created for general use in assisting the process of meditation. Regardless of their origins, they are uniformly powerful in their ability to connect the meditant with spiritual archetypes and realities, and are valuable tools for developing experience and knowledge of other dimensions. Matthew Barton has delicately translated these meditations into English, many for the first time, and arranged them thematically in this outstanding new series.

In this collection of meditations to promote harmony and healing, Rudolf Steiner helps us discover a renewed sense of our true place in the cosmos. The verses show how we can learn to know ourselves by looking outward to the substances and processes at work in the cosmos; and know the world by looking inward to the microcosmic depths of the human self. By integrating spirit and matter within, we can also heal divisions in our relationships with others. For modern people, increasingly divorced from a living relationship with nature, these verses help to unfold a world of interconnections.

Rudolf Steiner

Rudolf Steiner (1861–1925) was born in the small village of Kraljevec, Austro-Hungarian Empire (now in Croatia), where he grew up. As a young man, he lived in Weimar and Berlin, where he became a well-published scientific, literary, and philosophical scholar, known especially for his work with Goethe’s scientific writings. At the beginning of the twentieth century, he began to develop his early philosophical principles into an approach to systematic research into psychological and spiritual phenomena. Formally beginning his spiritual teaching career under the auspices of the Theosophical Society, Steiner came to use the term Anthroposophy (and spiritual science) for his philosophy, spiritual research, and findings. The influence of Steiner’s multifaceted genius has led to innovative and holistic approaches in medicine, various therapies, philosophy, religious renewal, Waldorf education, education for special needs, threefold economics, biodynamic agriculture, Goethean science, architecture, and the arts of drama, speech, and eurythmy. In 1924, Rudolf Steiner founded the General Anthroposophical Society, which today has branches throughout the world. He died in Dornach, Switzerland.