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The Boundaries of Natural Science

(CW 322)

Rudolf Steiner
Introduction by Saul Bellow
Paperback
June 1987
9780880101875
More details
  • Publisher
    SteinerBooks
  • Published
    1st June 1987
  • ISBN 9780880101875
  • Language English
  • Pages 128 pp.
$14.95

8 lectures, Dornach, Sep-Oct, 1920 (CW 322)

“We must begin by acquiring the discipline that modern science can teach us. We must school ourselves in this way and then, taking the strict methodology, the scientific discipline we have learned from modern natural science, transcend it, so that we use the same exacting approach to rise into higher regions, thereby extending this methodology to the investigation of entirely different realms as well.” —Rudolf Steiner

If only sensory phenomena are within the reach of scientific research, the doors are closed to those worlds from which the human being originates and where the creative forces of the world are found. Rudolf Steiner challenges us to develop organs of perception needed to go beyond these limits of perception, so that we can witness the spirit that is active in all natural phenomena.

This volume is a translation from German of Grenzen der Naturerkenntnis (GA 322).

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Rudolf Steiner

Rudolf Steiner (1861–1925) was born in the small village of Kraljevec, Austro-Hungarian Empire (now in Croatia), where he grew up. As a young man, he lived in Weimar and Berlin, where he became a well-published scientific, literary, and philosophical scholar, known especially for his work with Goethe’s scientific writings. At the beginning of the twentieth century, he began to develop his early philosophical principles into an approach to systematic research into psychological and spiritual phenomena. Formally beginning his spiritual teaching career under the auspices of the Theosophical Society, Steiner came to use the term Anthroposophy (and spiritual science) for his philosophy, spiritual research, and findings. The influence of Steiner’s multifaceted genius has led to innovative and holistic approaches in medicine, various therapies, philosophy, religious renewal, Waldorf education, education for special needs, threefold economics, biodynamic agriculture, Goethean science, architecture, and the arts of drama, speech, and eurythmy. In 1924, Rudolf Steiner founded the General Anthroposophical Society, which today has branches throughout the world. He died in Dornach, Switzerland.